Case Studies

In depth analysis of the business of sport…

  • Until you actually work in the sports industry, it's tough to really explain and replicate the pace of the job. It truly is a lifestyle commitment. The fast pace, the excitement, the energy, the games, and the difference of each and every day can make working in sports exciting and fun. However, on the other hand, because the job and hours always change and the demands are continual it can be overwhelming at times. This piece by Bob Hamer of Sports Business Solutions...
  • From guys like Lebron James, Cristiano Ronaldo, Marshawn Lynch, Derek Jeter, David Beckham and so many others we have seen many a number of athletes expanding their brand beyond their playing sport. So how does an athlete build their brand. In this first article from iSport blogger Margaret Ntim she gives us the answer...
  • Recently a high-stake qualifying game of the FIBA Eurobasket between Bosnia and Herzegovina and Russia was played in Tuzla. This game was especially important for the hosts, because losing it would significantly lower their chances to qualifiy for the 2017 Eurobasket. Which is exactly what happened, and Bosnian players were escorted off the court with boos from their own crowd. What happened next is a great case study in how players and sports administrators can manage the communication process when a crisis emerges and was originally published on the Promo Overtime blog...
  • This case study examines how myopic marketing practices may detract from the ability for a given sport to evolve and grow. It is founded on the seminal work of Theodore Levitt and has some salutary lessons for anyone involved in sport...
  • For most of the clubs I know, maintaining or increasing attendances will be their biggest challenge in the season ahead. Achieving sporting glory will always be the ultimate objective, but most of us know that this is as likely as 6 numbers coming up on Saturday night. What matters is sustainability and I know, without any doubt whatsoever, that a club that builds engagement on shared values, delivers consistently positive experiences and acts with the supporter’s best interests at heart will thrive - regardless of how well it performs on the pitch. Mark Bradley blogs here...
  • The recent decision by Australia's Commonwealth Bank to cease its direct sponsorship of the Australian men's Cricket Test Team is a stark illustration of how changes in strategic thinking can effect even an iconic brand. It also serves to illustrate that women's sport is now a genuine contender and indeed competitor for corporate sponsorship dollars globally.
  • Sponsorship, a versatile and affordable form of marketing, is used widely but not always wisely by law firms to build awareness and connect with their communities. Supporting a worthy cause, whether it’s a charity, sports team, event, student group or local non-profit initiative, is a subtle, “feel good” way to promote a business. It demonstrates social responsibility and highlights what’s best about the firm, and can be particularly effective at reaching a niche market, creating interest among select prospective clients and developing a distinctive brand.
  • Every weekend thousands of dedicated sport event participants travel to the far reaches of regional and rural Australia to compete, marshal and officiate in an increasingly diverse range of sport events. For the first time researchers from the Griffith Institute for Tourism at Griffith University have attempted to document just how many and how diverse these events are, and to consider the implications of these events on the towns that host them, and on sport participation and development.
  • Sponsorship valuation is complicated and technical…but it is an essential piece of the sponsorship puzzle. In fact, I would argue that it is THE most important part of the technical side of sponsorship sales (with relationship building being the most important part of the soft side of sponsorship sales). Let’s explore a case study of two properties and their experience with sponsorship valuation. This from the Sponsorship Collective's Chris Baylis...
  • Event tourism research explores the travel behaviours of competitors and spectators at sport (and cultural) events to determine their impact over the longer term, and their contribution to the local community. While the focus is often on the economic impact (and a $ output), other metric and non-metric indicators can guide planning decisions and contribute to a wider understanding of the contribution of the event to the community. Similarly, while larger events such as the Gold Coast Marathon are the focus of media attention, regional communities should also be aware that smaller events can provide a direct and immediate boost to the economy, and a longer term impact to the image and visitation to the destination. It is also important to assess the sectors in which benefits are likely to be seen, but also the sectors which may in fact see negative impacts from these events. Recent research from a competitor survey at the Kingscliff Triathlon illustrates these ideas.